Video: How Eagles Are Making Wind Turbines Safer for Birds

NREL researcher Jason Roadman and veterinarian Seth Oster release a bald eagle from a lift during one of the test flights.

NREL researcher Jason Roadman and veterinarian Seth Oster release a bald eagle from a lift during one of the test flights. Energy Department

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National Renewable Energy Laboratory scientists are using the eagles to conduct research into how to reduce collisions and make wind energy safer for birds.

A bald eagle and a golden eagle, named Spirit and Nova, respectively, are getting a lot of work done for the Energy Department -- and their fellow birds.

National Renewable Energy Laboratory scientists are using the eagles to conduct research into how to reduce collisions and make wind energy safer for birds. 

Researchers partnered with Laufer Wind to send Spirit and Nova, outfitted with GPS trackers, on 25 tests flights at the National Wind Technology Center in Boulder, Colorado.

Developers will now be able to use the terabytes of flight data gathered to improve their detection algorithms, ultimately reducing collisions and saving bird lives.

To see the eagles in action, check out the video below from the Energy Department: