Author Archive

Patrick Tucker

Technology Editor

Patrick Tucker
Patrick Tucker is technology editor for Defense One. He’s also the author of The Naked Future: What Happens in a World That Anticipates Your Every Move? (Current, 2014). Previously, Tucker was deputy editor for The Futurist for nine years. Tucker has written about emerging technology in Slate, The Sun, MIT Technology Review, Wilson Quarterly, The American Legion Magazine, BBC News Magazine, Utne Reader, and elsewhere.
Emerging Tech

Ukraine Startup Building Drones with Grenade Launchers

A prototype Ukrainian drone has carries a grenade launcher. Still unclear: — how it’s going to get past Russia’s jammers.

IT Modernization

Someone Is Waging a Secret War to Undermine the Pentagon’s Huge Cloud Contract

The battle for the Defense Department’s $10 billion war cloud is getting a lot more interesting.

Cybersecurity

Tomorrow’s Intelligent Malware Will Attack When It Sees Your Face

IBM researchers have injected viruses with neural nets, making them stealthier and precisely targetable.

Cybersecurity

Russian Military Spy Software is on Hundreds of Thousands of Home Routers

In May, the Justice Department told Americans to reboot their routers. But there's more to do — and NSA says it's up to device makers and the public.

Cybersecurity

The Future Airman is a Hacker

Air Force recruiters will prize computer skills more highly, while the service will encourage airmen to experiment with their own solutions

Emerging Tech

Who’s Leading the Western Response to Russia’s Warbots? Estonia

A European leader in robotic autonomy turns its attention to the battlefield.

Data

Surveillance Cameras Will Soon Divine Your Personality from Eye Movements

Machine-learning techniques promise to make biometric data far more useful for intelligence gathering.

Emerging Tech

Satellite Imagery + Social Media = A New Way to Spot Emerging Nuclear Threats

A research team is training computers to find and fuse clues from wildly different rivers of digital data.

Cybersecurity

Pentagon Creates ‘Do Not Buy’ List of Russian, Chinese Software

Increasingly alarmed at foreign hacking, DOD and intelligence officials are racing to educate the military and defense contractors.

Cybersecurity

China Is Still Stealing America’s Business Secrets, U.S. Officials Say

The 2015 agreement between Xi and Obama produced only a lull in Beijing’s economic espionage.

Cybersecurity

Computers Have Found a Better Way to Spot Emailed Malware, Researchers Say

Somehow no one thought of applying machine learning to malicious email in exactly this way. But the results are big.

Cybersecurity

Chinese Hackers Targeted Internet-of-Things During Trump-Putin Summit

A spike in attacks sought access to devices that might yield audio or visual intelligence.

Emerging Tech

Google DeepMind Researchers Join Pledge Not to Work in Lethal AI

Thousands of AI researchers sign letter forgoing work on autonomous weapons.

Cybersecurity

Russia’s Foreign-Software Approval Service Helps Military Hackers: Report

The agency that ostensibly reviews foreign-made wares for vulnerabilities sends the lion’s share straight to its hacker squads.

Cybersecurity

China, Russia, and the U.S. Are All Building Centers for Military AI

But their burgeoning approaches to state-sponsored research are divergent as the countries themselves.

Cybersecurity

Hacker Caught Selling Maintenance Manuals for Military Drones

A poorly configured router allowed the theft of drone manuals, a list of maintainers, material on the Abrams tank, and more.

CIO Briefing

What Trump’s Space Force Announcement Means

New plan would create sixth service branch, and annoy the Air Force.

Emerging Tech

Here’s How Google Pitched AI Tools to Special Operators Last Month

Even as the company drew back from its work on Project Maven, a sales team was going full steam ahead at a big SOF conference.

Cybersecurity

Russia, Too, Is Building a Giant War Cloud

It’s the latest improvement in the Russian military’s ability to operate off the rest of the world’s grid.