Author Archive

Andrea Noble

Staff Correspondent

Andrea Noble is a Staff Correspondent at Route Fifty. She most recently worked as an investigator for the House Energy and Commerce Committee through a fellowship with the Project on Government Oversight. Previously, she covered law enforcement and the Justice Department for The Washington Times and local government in Maryland for The Gazette.
Cybersecurity

FCC Renews Effort to Block Robocalls to 911 Call Centers

Under a proposed rule, voice service providers would cross reference autodialed calls with numbers on the do not call list to block any robocalls to emergency lines.

Cybersecurity

States Snag $240M to Combat Unemployment Fraud

The federal grant funding can be used to pay for identity verification services, cybersecurity, or other expenses related to fraud detection.

Emerging Tech

Cryptocurrency Company Makes Case for Running its Own Local Government

A Nevada commission is studying the concept. An executive with Blockchains Inc. says its plans for an "innovation zone" won't work inside an existing county.

Emerging Tech

FCC Releases First U.S. Mobile Broadband Map

The map, which shows where the four largest mobile carriers offer voice and data services, is a step toward improving the accuracy of high-speed internet access data.

Emerging Tech

What One City Hopes to Learn by Pausing Use of Facial Recognition Technology

A ban in Baltimore would restrict the city from purchasing facial recognition technology and temporarily restrict use by city agencies, residents and businesses (but not the police).

CIO Briefing

As Variant Spreads, Some Regions Bring Back Mask Advisories

In St. Louis and Los Angeles, officials are urging vaccinated residents to wear masks as cases of the Delta strain of Covid-19 are on the rise.

Policy

Billions of Federal Dollars to Close Broadband Gaps are About to Start Flowing

The FCC has launched a program that provides $50 subsidies to help households pay internet bills and also approved rules for a $7 billion fund for libraries and schools.

Policy

Senate Committee Clashes over Sweeping Election Reform Bill

Lawmakers failed to advance the For the People Act out of committee, but Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer is expected to bring the bill to the floor anyhow.

Cybersecurity

Single Sign-in For Government Services Expands to States, Localities

The federal government is looking to partner with state and local governments to grow its Login.gov service, which it says is secure and user friendly.

Policy

Buttigieg Underscores Urgency of Transportation Infrastructure Investment

Republican lawmakers are skeptical of the scope of the Biden administration’s planned infrastructure package, which the president is expected to provide more details on next week.

IT Modernization

Lawmakers Urge Internet Companies to Join New Discount Broadband Program

The Emergency Broadband Benefit Program, slated to start at the end of April, will provide discounts on internet service to struggling households.

IT Modernization

The FCC Wants Your Feedback to Improve Broadband Access

In an effort to create more accurate maps detailing broadband connections and service, the Federal Communications Commission is collecting first-hand accounts from users.

Emerging Tech

After Decision Upholding FCC’s 5G Rules, Cities Now Weighing Appeal

The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals largely upheld FCC rules limiting local government’s ability to regulate 5G infrastructure and cap fees. Cities involved in the case have until Sept. 28 to file an appeal, but some experts say the ruling wasn’t all bad.

Cybersecurity

Ransomware Attacks Demanding Larger Payouts from Local Governments

The average ransom demanded of a local government in a cyberattack grew from $30,000 to $380,000, according to one cybersecurity firm.

IT Modernization

One-Third of U.S. Workers Want Permanent Remote Work

A new Morning Consult survey finds many workers would like to continue working from home after the coronavirus pandemic recedes and some would likely move to a new city or state if remote work becomes permanent.

CIO Briefing

Pandemic, Civil Unrest Complicate Voting in the Nation’s Capital

Washington, D.C. is among the jurisdictions that encouraged residents to vote by mail to stay safe amid the coronavirus pandemic, but voters who came out to the polls Tuesday still encountered long lines.

CIO Briefing

Weeding Out Fraudulent Unemployment Claims Just Became More Difficult

Millions of out-of-work Americans are filing for unemployment during the coronavirus pandemic and fraudsters are using the unprecedented crush of filings to take advantage.

Policy

States Struggle to Get Vote-by-Mail Plans Ready in Time

Many states delayed their primaries to give election officials more time to prepare, but quickly overhauling procedures comes with real challenges. What will it all mean for the November elections?

Data

States Start Hiring Battalions of Contact Tracers to Track Covid-19

As governors look to loosen coronavirus restrictions, a key benchmark will be improving the ability to track and isolate new cases. That will include more “contact tracers,” investigators who track down those who’ve come in contact with infected people.

CIO Briefing

Real ID Deadline Postponed Due to Coronavirus

President Trump pushed back the Oct. 1 deadline that would have required Americans to have Real ID compliant driver’s licenses and other identification cards in order to board an airplane.