Teen Who Posted Nudies from Snapchat Hack Gets Hacked

Featured eBooks

The Government's Artificial Intelligence Reality
What’s Next for Federal Customer Experience
What's Next for Government Data

Web Services

Mudit Grover, who created a website to distribute 98,000 hacked Snapchat pictures and videos, decided to shut it down. Then his own data was leaked.

Grover’s site, TheSnappening.org, had served as a one-stop-shop for viewing a mammoth snap dump that is scattered across various online forums.

A few hours after Grover took down the site, hackers commandeered the domain and posted a message identifying themselves as "Team Danny." The group published Grover's alleged personal address, as well as his cellphone and home number.

Reached via secure chat, one of the hackers told Mashable that they decided to target the teen for kicks.

"Thought it'd be funny," he said, adding that the hack was "trivial," and that Grover “deserved it."

The hacked snaps included many explicit photos sent by unknowing girls through Snapchat, an app that offers disappearing messages. Snapsaved, an illegal third party app that archives snaps, apparently was the source.

The Team Danny hacker refused to provide details on how he hacked TheSnappening.org, or reveal any personal information about him. Shortly afterward, Grover seemed to regain control of his website.