recommended reading

Threatwatch

Cyberattack shuts down major Israeli roadway

Unauthorized use of system administrator privileges

A key thoroughfare in the northern city of Haifa was out of commission because of a network intrusion during September 2013. The attack halted operations for two consecutive days.

The Carmel Tunnels toll road is the most high-profile landmark known to have been attacked in Israel. It is a major roadway for Israel's third-largest city, and the city is looking to turn the tunnel into a public shelter in case of emergency.

One expert, speaking to the AP on condition of anonymity because the breach was a classified matter, said a Trojan horse targeted the tunnel’s security camera system on Sept. 8. A Trojan horse is a malicious computer program unwittingly installed by victims that allows hackers to completely overtake their systems.

The expert said investigators believe the attack was the work of unknown, sophisticated hackers, similar to the Anonymous hacktivist group that led attacks on Israeli websites in April 2013. But it was not sophisticated enough to be the work of a nation state like Iran.

Carmelton, the company that oversees the toll road, denied being hacked, blaming a "communication glitch" for the mishap.

Oren David, a manager at international security firm RSA's anti-fraud unit, said that although he didn't have information about the tunnel incident, this kind of attack "is the hallmark of a new era."

ThreatWatch is a regularly updated catalog of data breaches successfully striking every sector of the globe, as reported by journalists, researchers and the victims themselves.

sector

Transportation

reported

October 27, 2013

reported by

Associated Press

number affected

Unknown

location of breach

Haifa, Israel

perpetrators

Hacktivists

location of perpetrators

Unknown

date breach occurred

September 2013

date breach detected

September 2013

Thank you for subscribing to newsletters from Nextgov.com.
We think these reports might interest you:

  • It’s Time for the Federal Government to Embrace Wireless and Mobility

    The United States has turned a corner on the adoption of mobile phones, tablets and other smart devices, outpacing traditional desktop and laptop sales by a wide margin. This issue brief discusses the state of wireless and mobility in federal government and outlines why now is the time to embrace these technologies in government.

    Download
  • Featured Content from RSA Conference: Dissed by NIST

    Learn more about the latest draft of the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology guidance document on authentication and lifecycle management.

    Download
  • A New Security Architecture for Federal Networks

    Federal government networks are under constant attack, and the number of those attacks is increasing. This issue brief discusses today's threats and a new model for the future.

    Download
  • Going Agile:Revolutionizing Federal Digital Services Delivery

    Here’s one indication that times have changed: Harriet Tubman is going to be the next face of the twenty dollar bill. Another sign of change? The way in which the federal government arrived at that decision.

    Download
  • Software-Defined Networking

    So many demands are being placed on federal information technology networks, which must handle vast amounts of data, accommodate voice and video, and cope with a multitude of highly connected devices while keeping government information secure from cyber threats. This issue brief discusses the state of SDN in the federal government and the path forward.

    Download
  • The New IP: Moving Government Agencies Toward the Network of The Future

    Federal IT managers are looking to modernize legacy network infrastructures that are taxed by growing demands from mobile devices, video, vast amounts of data, and more. This issue brief discusses the federal government network landscape, as well as market, financial force drivers for network modernization.

    Download

When you download a report, your information may be shared with the underwriters of that document.