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Low-Skill Workers Aren’t Actually the Ones Most Threatened by Robots

June 26, 2017 There are a lot of jobs that can only be completed with significant training, but don’t involve much critical thinking once the skill is learned—machine operators and office clerks, for examples. And in rich countries, they are on the cusp of becoming endangered. Thanks primarily to automation, and to a...

This Massachusetts County Tells the 40-Year Story of U.S. Jobs

June 16, 2017 The big story in the US labor market over the past 40 years is the fall of manufacturing jobs and the rise of service-sector work in industries like health care and education. In 1975, 22% of all private sector jobs in the US were in manufacturing, more than three times...

Federal Government Is Concerned Coworkers Don’t Hang Out As Much As They Used To

May 24, 2017 The Joint Economic Committee of the Congress recently released an unusual document. The report, titled “What We Do Together,” presupposes Americans feel a “sense of loss” for the “golden age” of social cohesion of the mid-20th century and then seeks to investigate all the ways the American social fabric is...

The Four Eras of American Jobs, in One Century-spanning Chart

May 10, 2017 In the 1950s, the health care industry accounted for only around 3% of jobs in America. Today, it’s nearly 13% of the labor market. At the current pace of growth, health care jobs will surpass retail jobs for the first time near the end of this year. While agriculture jobs...

from govexec

The Biggest Stereotype About the Professional Lives of Millennials in the U.S. is Wrong

April 18, 2017 Millennials have developed a reputation as job hoppers. Entitled and impatient, the story goes, young workers in the U.S. get bored easily, jumping from company to company looking for better opportunities sooner than they deserve them. But if you examine the data, this narrative appears almost entirely wrong. In fact,...

Police More Likely to Give White People Breaks on Speeding Tickets

April 11, 2017 The US-based economists Felipe Goncalves and Steven Mello have both had the police give them a break. It gave them a brilliant idea for uncovering racial bias in policing. Both Goncalves and Mello had been stopped for driving above the speed limit, and when a police officer wrote their ticket,...

The U.S. States That Rely The Most on Trade With China

April 6, 2017 The West and Southeast of the US are unusually reliant on China for trade. Chinese president Xi Jinping’s visit to the US for a summit with president Donald Trump comes amidst tense times for free traders. Trump’s bellicose talk about China’s “illegal” trading practices was central to his successful election...

Mapped: Where American Income Has Grown the Most Over the Past 25 Years

March 30, 2017 As the Rust Belt stagnated, coastal metropolises thrived. As Appalachia sputtered, shale country boomed. As Southern manufacturing centers shut their doors, neighboring research hubs opened theirs. These are just a few of the trends that have played out in regional economies across the U.S. over the past 25 years. This...

Killing Free Trade Will Rob the World of a Highly Effective Deterrent to War

March 4, 2017 Donald Trump, like populists around the world, says that free trade destroys local jobs and harms economic growth. These claims are disputable, but they miss the point. History shows that trade agreements are rarely about economics alone. They are a tool of diplomacy—a way to shore up old alliances and...

New Research Shows Who Will Be Hurt—And Helped—If America’s Tech Industry Can’t Hire World’s Best Talent

February 16, 2017 President Donald Trump’s threats to overhaul the H1-B program, the largest visa program for allowing high-skilled immigrants to work in the U.S., has Silicon Valley shaking in its boots. But American computer scientists might want to root Trump on. The H-1B visa, created for college graduates with knowledge in a...