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The FAA Will Require $5 Registration Fee for Drones

December 14, 2015 Con­sumers who buy drones will have to re­gister with the gov­ern­ment and pay a $5 fee, the Fed­er­al Avi­ation Ad­min­is­tra­tion an­nounced Monday. The move is an at­tempt by fed­er­al reg­u­lat­ors to gain some con­trol over the bur­geon­ing drone in­dustry, which is ex­pect­ing a surge in sales for the hol­i­days. Law­makers...

Feds Will Require $5 Registration Fee for Drones

December 14, 2015 Con­sumers who buy drones will have to re­gister with the gov­ern­ment and pay a $5 fee, the Fed­er­al Avi­ation Ad­min­is­tra­tion an­nounced Monday. The move is an at­tempt by fed­er­al reg­u­lat­ors to gain some con­trol over the bur­geon­ing drone in­dustry, which is ex­pect­ing a surge in sales for the hol­i­days. Law­makers...

FBI Chief Admits It’s Impossible to Ban All Encryption

December 10, 2015 FBI Dir­ect­or James Comey ac­know­ledged Wed­nes­day that de­term­ined ter­ror­ists and crim­in­als will al­ways have ways to hide their com­mu­nic­a­tions from the gov­ern­ment. Even if Con­gress re­quires U.S. tech com­pan­ies to guar­an­tee ac­cess to their devices and ser­vices, there will likely still be for­eign com­pan­ies that of­fer strong en­cryp­tion, Comey said...

from govexec

FBI Director: It’s Impossible to Ban All Encryption

December 9, 2015 FBI Dir­ect­or James Comey ac­know­ledged Wed­nes­day that de­term­ined ter­ror­ists and crim­in­als will al­ways have ways to hide their com­mu­nic­a­tions from the gov­ern­ment. Even if Con­gress re­quires U.S. tech com­pan­ies to guar­an­tee ac­cess to their devices and ser­vices, there will likely still be for­eign com­pan­ies that of­fer strong en­cryp­tion, Comey said...

House Homeland Security Chairman Wants Commission to Study Encryption

December 8, 2015 Key law­makers in both cham­bers on Monday pro­posed some of the first bills to ad­dress the use of en­cryp­ted com­mu­nic­a­tions in the wake of the ter­ror­ist at­tacks in Par­is and San Bern­ardino. The pro­pos­als from Sen­ate Demo­crats and House Re­pub­lic­ans wouldn’t man­date that the gov­ern­ment have “back­door” ac­cess to com­mu­nic­a­tions....

3 Key Questions about the Upcoming Net Neutrality Court Fight

December 3, 2015 Three fed­er­al judges will hear ar­gu­ments Fri­day in a case that could have far-reach­ing im­plic­a­tions for the fu­ture of the In­ter­net. Law­yers for the Fed­er­al Com­mu­nic­a­tions Com­mis­sion will ap­pear be­fore a pan­el of the D.C. Cir­cuit Court of Ap­peals to de­fend their net-neut­ral­ity reg­u­la­tions from law­suits filed by an ar­ray...

Why Is the Wildly Popular Email Privacy Act Still Stuck in Congress?

December 2, 2015 It’s among the most pop­u­lar bills in Con­gress, but it’s still stuck in com­mit­tee. More than 300 House mem­bers—a ma­jor­ity of the body—have signed on as co­spon­sors to the Email Pri­vacy Act, which would re­quire po­lice to ob­tain a war­rant be­fore ac­cess­ing emails, Face­book mes­sages, and oth­er private on­line con­tent....

from govexec

Most House Members Want to End Email Spying. Why Hasn’t Their Bill Moved?

December 2, 2015 It’s among the most pop­u­lar bills in Con­gress, but it’s still stuck in com­mit­tee. More than 300 House mem­bers—a ma­jor­ity of the body—have signed on as co­spon­sors to the Email Pri­vacy Act, which would re­quire po­lice to ob­tain a war­rant be­fore ac­cess­ing emails, Face­book mes­sages, and oth­er private on­line con­tent....

Is Congress All Bark and No Bite on Encryption?

November 24, 2015 Major tra­gedies have a way of shift­ing the le­gis­lat­ive pro­cess in­to hy­per speed. Con­gress passed the Pat­ri­ot Act, for ex­ample, just a little more than a month after the Sept. 11 ter­ror­ist at­tacks. More re­cently, the House draf­ted and passed a bill to lim­it Syr­i­an and Ir­aqi refugees just days...

Senate Committee Votes to Protect Right to Post Negative Yelp Reviews

November 18, 2015 The Sen­ate Com­merce Com­mit­tee ad­vanced le­gis­la­tion Wed­nes­day aimed at pro­tect­ing the right of con­sumers to leave neg­at­ive on­line re­views about busi­nesses. The Con­sumer Re­view Free­dom Act, which passed the pan­el in a voice vote, would bar the use of con­trac­tu­al gag clauses that pro­hib­it con­sumers from say­ing any­thing dis­par­aging about...