recommended reading

Electronic etiquette going down the drain, survey says

The legions of workers glued to their "Crackberries" and other electronic devices in Washington, D.C., have become the stuff of legend.

Now, just in time for some light Friday reading, Intel has released 2011 State of Mobile Etiquette survey, confirming what many veterans of D.C. traffic and public transit already know: 75 percent of respondents say mobile manners are worse than they were just one year ago.

Nine out of ten people who responded to the online survey said they have seen people misuse their mobile devices, according to the survey. Among the top pet peeves? Texting while driving, talking loudly in public places, and a Capitol Hill oldie but goodie - sending emails while walking.

"New digital technologies are becoming a mainstay in consumers' lives, but we haven't yet worked out for ourselves, our families, communities and societies what all the right kinds of behaviors and expectations will be," said Intel's Genevieve Bell. "Our appropriate digital technology behaviors are still embryonic, and it's important for Intel and the entire industry to maintain a dialogue about the way people use technology and our personal relationships with technology as they continue to help shape societal and cultural norms."

Etiquette (e-tiquette?) author Anna Post of The Emily Post Institute offers some advice on how to manage "public displays of technology."

"The premise of etiquette and how we socialize with one another is not a new concept. Whenever we interact with another person directly or through the use of mobile technology, etiquette is a factor," she said in a statement. "We can all be more cognizant of how we use our mobile technology and how our usage may impact others around us - at home, in the office and whenever we are in public."

The survey, sponsored by Intel and conducted online by Ipsos, asked a nationally representative sample of 2,000 American adults about their experience with mobile etiquette. It has a margin of error of +/- 2.2 percentage points.

Threatwatch Alert

Software vulnerability

Google Discloses Another Unpatched Microsoft Bug

See threatwatch report

JOIN THE DISCUSSION

Close [ x ] More from Nextgov
 
 

Thank you for subscribing to newsletters from Nextgov.com.
We think these reports might interest you:

  • It’s Time for the Federal Government to Embrace Wireless and Mobility

    The United States has turned a corner on the adoption of mobile phones, tablets and other smart devices, outpacing traditional desktop and laptop sales by a wide margin. This issue brief discusses the state of wireless and mobility in federal government and outlines why now is the time to embrace these technologies in government.

    Download
  • Featured Content from RSA Conference: Dissed by NIST

    Learn more about the latest draft of the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology guidance document on authentication and lifecycle management.

    Download
  • A New Security Architecture for Federal Networks

    Federal government networks are under constant attack, and the number of those attacks is increasing. This issue brief discusses today's threats and a new model for the future.

    Download
  • Going Agile:Revolutionizing Federal Digital Services Delivery

    Here’s one indication that times have changed: Harriet Tubman is going to be the next face of the twenty dollar bill. Another sign of change? The way in which the federal government arrived at that decision.

    Download
  • Software-Defined Networking

    So many demands are being placed on federal information technology networks, which must handle vast amounts of data, accommodate voice and video, and cope with a multitude of highly connected devices while keeping government information secure from cyber threats. This issue brief discusses the state of SDN in the federal government and the path forward.

    Download
  • The New IP: Moving Government Agencies Toward the Network of The Future

    Federal IT managers are looking to modernize legacy network infrastructures that are taxed by growing demands from mobile devices, video, vast amounts of data, and more. This issue brief discusses the federal government network landscape, as well as market, financial force drivers for network modernization.

    Download

When you download a report, your information may be shared with the underwriters of that document.