recommended reading

This 6-Year-Old Wants to Be an Astronaut, So He's Petitioning the White House to Save NASA

NASA

For half of his life, Connor Johnson has dreamed of being an astronaut

And not just for the adventure of it. Not just for the romance, or the celebrity, or the outfits ... but for the giddy newness of it. Johnson wants to be a sailor of stars, he says, "so I can discover, like, new worlds."  

Johnson, sure, may be only six years old. But he has wanted to be an astronaut since he was three. That's half a lifetime of desire. His toys are NASA-themed. His bedtime stories tell tales of Jupiter. He has been known to dress up as space shuttles. So he was crushed to learn, recently, about proposed funding cuts to the agency's science and space exploration programs

Johnson, like any would-be astronaut, felt compelled to act. So he did what he could, given his dreams and his age: He gave his allowance to NASA, making NASA's budget deficit $10.41 smaller than it used to be. Then, he donated his life's savings to the cause. (Or, as the Denver news station WHNT puts it, "he decided to give his whole piggy bank to NASA.")

But Johnson realized that one person—even if that one person dreams big—could only do so much. So he took to the Internet. He started a petition on WhiteHouse.gov, asking the government to increase its funding for NASA. The petition has gotten more than 9,000 signatures so far. It needs 100,000 signatures to receive a White House reply. So the challenge is great: This would-be astronaut still has a long, long way to go before he reaches his destination. 

His cause, however, is noble. He comes in peace for all mankind. 

The reason his petition gives for its request? "So we can discover new worlds, protect us from danger and to make dreams come true."

And the author it lists? "CJ, Age: 6.5."

Threatwatch Alert

Thousands of cyber attacks occur each day

See the latest threats

JOIN THE DISCUSSION

Close [ x ] More from Nextgov
 
 

Thank you for subscribing to newsletters from Nextgov.com.
We think these reports might interest you:

  • Data-Centric Security vs. Database-Level Security

    Database-level encryption had its origins in the 1990s and early 2000s in response to very basic risks which largely revolved around the theft of servers, backup tapes and other physical-layer assets. As noted in Verizon’s 2014, Data Breach Investigations Report (DBIR)1, threats today are far more advanced and dangerous.

    Download
  • Featured Content from RSA Conference: Dissed by NIST

    Learn more about the latest draft of the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology guidance document on authentication and lifecycle management.

    Download
  • PIV- I And Multifactor Authentication: The Best Defense for Federal Government Contractors

    This white paper explores NIST SP 800-171 and why compliance is critical to federal government contractors, especially those that work with the Department of Defense, as well as how leveraging PIV-I credentialing with multifactor authentication can be used as a defense against cyberattacks

    Download
  • Toward A More Innovative Government

    This research study aims to understand how state and local leaders regard their agency’s innovation efforts and what they are doing to overcome the challenges they face in successfully implementing these efforts.

    Download
  • From Volume to Value: UK’s NHS Digital Provides U.S. Healthcare Agencies A Roadmap For Value-Based Payment Models

    The U.S. healthcare industry is rapidly moving away from traditional fee-for-service models and towards value-based purchasing that reimburses physicians for quality of care in place of frequency of care.

    Download
  • GBC Flash Poll: Is Your Agency Safe?

    Federal leaders weigh in on the state of information security

    Download

When you download a report, your information may be shared with the underwriters of that document.