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Turns Out the CIA Really Is Trying to Control the Weather

Mihai Simonia/Shutterstock.com

The Central Intelligence Agency is funding a scientific study that will investigate whether humans could use geo-engineering to alter Earth's environment and stop climate change. TheNational Academy of Sciences will run the 21-month project, which is the first NAS geo-engineering study financially supported by an intelligence agency. With the spooks' money, scientists will study how humans might influence weather patterns, assess the potential dangers of messing with the climate, and investigate possible national security implications of geo-engineering attempts. 

The total cost of the project is $630,000, which NAS is splitting with the CIA, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and NASA. The NAS website says that "the US intelligence community" is funding the project, and William Kearney, a spokesman for NAS, told Mother Jones that phrase refers to the CIA. Edward Price, a spokesman for the CIA, refused to confirm the agency's role in the study, but said, "It's natural that on a subject like climate change the Agency would work with scientists to better understand the phenomenon and its implications on national security." The CIA reportedly closed its research center on climate change and national security last year, after GOP members of Congress argued that the CIA shouldn't be looking at climate change.

The goal of the CIA-backed NAS study is to conduct a "technical evaluation of a limited number of proposed geo-engineering techniques," according to the NAS website. Scientists will attempt to determine which geo-engineering techniques are feasible and try to evaluate the impacts and risks of each (including "national security concerns"). One proposed geo-engineering method the study will look at is solar radiation management—a fancy term for pumping particles into the stratosphere to reflect incoming sunlight away from the planet. In theory, solar radiation management could lead to a global cooling trend that might reverse, or at least slow down, global warming. The study will also investigate proposals for removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.

Read more at The Atlantic Cities

(Image via Mihai Simonia/Shutterstock.com)

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