recommended reading

Naval Chief Views Information Key to Future of Warfare

Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert

Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert // Defense Department

Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert views “information dominance” as key to the future of warfare while the service’s new transformation framework calls for development of a “data-savvy” workforce.

Speaking at a ceremony last Thursday at which Rear Adm. David Lewis took command of the Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command in San Diego, Greenert said: “SPAWAR is the technical agent for information dominance, we know that. It is also the technical agent for a new era in Navy and naval warfare. Control of the information is going to be the key to the future.”

That control includes electronic warfare systems. Greenert focused on shortcomings in jamming systems used by the EA-18G “Growler” electronic attack aircraft in his SPAWAR speech. 

“Until we put a pod on the Growlers, with all the electronics working to dominate the electromagnetic spectrum, they're just aircraft flying around burning fuel,” he said.

Lewis emphasized cyber is a war-fighting challenge and will require an all hands on deck approach. His stressed that every Navy system will be cyber secure and every Navy sailor, civilian and contractor cyber savvy.

Lewis said, “We will deliver systems that balance mission and cost with cyber protection, so the fleet fights on the ‘network’ just like we fight on the seas and in the air.”

The Navy’s 2014-2016 Transformation Plan released last week said while the Navy and Marines collect and report “a vast amount of data internally and externally” to various stakeholders, analysis and reporting efforts are often disconnected, costly and lack sufficient context to be actionable

The Transformation Plan calls for the two services to “develop a data and analytics-savvy workforce” guided by a “comprehensive business intelligence system [that] will enable users from across the business enterprise to access rich information to analyze, report and present in a user-specified format.”

According to the plan, the Navy and the Marines also need to take a cost-effective approach to information technology systems. The plan calls for the Navy chief information officer – currently Thomas Hicks serving as acting CIO – to “foster a cost-conscious culture that ensures IT/cyberspace solutions are based on best-value analysis and are integrated into a larger enterprisewide architecture.”

Threatwatch Alert

Thousands of cyber attacks occur each day

See the latest threats

JOIN THE DISCUSSION

Close [ x ] More from Nextgov
 
 

Thank you for subscribing to newsletters from Nextgov.com.
We think these reports might interest you:

  • It’s Time for the Federal Government to Embrace Wireless and Mobility

    The United States has turned a corner on the adoption of mobile phones, tablets and other smart devices, outpacing traditional desktop and laptop sales by a wide margin. This issue brief discusses the state of wireless and mobility in federal government and outlines why now is the time to embrace these technologies in government.

    Download
  • Featured Content from RSA Conference: Dissed by NIST

    Learn more about the latest draft of the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology guidance document on authentication and lifecycle management.

    Download
  • A New Security Architecture for Federal Networks

    Federal government networks are under constant attack, and the number of those attacks is increasing. This issue brief discusses today's threats and a new model for the future.

    Download
  • Going Agile:Revolutionizing Federal Digital Services Delivery

    Here’s one indication that times have changed: Harriet Tubman is going to be the next face of the twenty dollar bill. Another sign of change? The way in which the federal government arrived at that decision.

    Download
  • Software-Defined Networking

    So many demands are being placed on federal information technology networks, which must handle vast amounts of data, accommodate voice and video, and cope with a multitude of highly connected devices while keeping government information secure from cyber threats. This issue brief discusses the state of SDN in the federal government and the path forward.

    Download
  • The New IP: Moving Government Agencies Toward the Network of The Future

    Federal IT managers are looking to modernize legacy network infrastructures that are taxed by growing demands from mobile devices, video, vast amounts of data, and more. This issue brief discusses the federal government network landscape, as well as market, financial force drivers for network modernization.

    Download

When you download a report, your information may be shared with the underwriters of that document.