recommended reading

This declaration of Internet freedom is vague

Realinemedia/Shutterstock.com

As a reaction to SOPA and other complex legislative efforts to regulate the Internet, online activists have created a Declaration of Internet Freedom, which consists of five very broad principles to keep the Internet free and open. At fewer than 100 words, compared to the convoluted anti-piracy bills it's a response to, the declaration's length seems itself to be an attack on the anti-Internet contingent. Unlike the big bad government, which buries information in its confusing thousand-page long legislation, the authors of this concise declaration seem to be aiming for a transparent document for Internet transparency. That sentiment not only embodies the pro-Internet contingent, it also shows why these two sides have yet to come together to address Internet regulation.

This Declaration of Internet Freedom was put together by a large coalition of privacy groups, Web sites, and individuals, which Free Press has listed here on its site. TechDirt, one of these founding parties, suggests the document is in the discussion phase, pointing readers to Reddit and cheezburger pages where they can continue forming the document, meaning this thing will get beefed up a bit, maybe? We haven't found anywhere that details the process further, though. Perhaps this is just to get the Internet talking to itself.

Click here to read the entire story on The Atlantic Wire.

(Image via Realinemedia/Shutterstock.com)

Threatwatch Alert

Stolen laptop

3.7M Hong Kong Voters' Personal Data Stolen

See threatwatch report

JOIN THE DISCUSSION

Close [ x ] More from Nextgov
 
 

Thank you for subscribing to newsletters from Nextgov.com.
We think these reports might interest you:

  • It’s Time for the Federal Government to Embrace Wireless and Mobility

    The United States has turned a corner on the adoption of mobile phones, tablets and other smart devices, outpacing traditional desktop and laptop sales by a wide margin. This issue brief discusses the state of wireless and mobility in federal government and outlines why now is the time to embrace these technologies in government.

    Download
  • Featured Content from RSA Conference: Dissed by NIST

    Learn more about the latest draft of the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology guidance document on authentication and lifecycle management.

    Download
  • A New Security Architecture for Federal Networks

    Federal government networks are under constant attack, and the number of those attacks is increasing. This issue brief discusses today's threats and a new model for the future.

    Download
  • Going Agile:Revolutionizing Federal Digital Services Delivery

    Here’s one indication that times have changed: Harriet Tubman is going to be the next face of the twenty dollar bill. Another sign of change? The way in which the federal government arrived at that decision.

    Download
  • Software-Defined Networking

    So many demands are being placed on federal information technology networks, which must handle vast amounts of data, accommodate voice and video, and cope with a multitude of highly connected devices while keeping government information secure from cyber threats. This issue brief discusses the state of SDN in the federal government and the path forward.

    Download
  • The New IP: Moving Government Agencies Toward the Network of The Future

    Federal IT managers are looking to modernize legacy network infrastructures that are taxed by growing demands from mobile devices, video, vast amounts of data, and more. This issue brief discusses the federal government network landscape, as well as market, financial force drivers for network modernization.

    Download

When you download a report, your information may be shared with the underwriters of that document.